Are Virtual Environments the Future for Training Oil and Gas Workers?

Offshore oil workers could benefit from enhanced training with technology.

Offshore oil workers could benefit from enhanced training with technology.

A study performed the American Red Cross found a combination of learning in a conventional classroom and a virtual environment could be the experience workers need to improve their emergency response, Occupational Health and Safety magazine reported.

The American Red Cross analysis of the U.S. Department of Education studies and other research revealed both types of learning environments are necessary to develop the skills to properly react in emergency situations.

Employers often include fire safety and fire watch safety training for oil and gas workers, as they are at risk for fires and explosions in the workplace. In the aftermath of an incident, companies also find that first aid and other procedures for life-supporting procedures are crucial to minimize fatalities at work sites.


A virtual environment could be crucial to train future oil and gas workers.

With more attention to emergency response programs, firms are focusing on the best ways to teach workers how to operate equipment and comply with health and safety regulations.

“As the oil and gas industry is using more advanced technological solutions to recover petroleum resources, technology is integral for firms to better train their workers.”

Virtual technology aids in oil and gas workforce training
As the oil and gas industry is using more advanced technological solutions to recover petroleum resources, technology is integral for firms to better train their workers.

Industrial Safety and Security Source reported on media and software firm FuelFX that makes visualization technology for workers to enhance operational safety. The company uses 3D imaging and visualization tools to train workers for work environments located both onshore and off.

The American Red Cross studied simulation learning, which offers a risk-free environment for employees to practice their skills. By learning from their mistakes, workers are more prepared to handle emergency situations.

The proponents of this virtual technology argue that practicing in this environment allows workers to retain more information about awareness at work, according to ISSS.

Another major learning tool health and safety professionals are turning to is scenario-based teaching, which gives workers more hands-on experience. This type of learning could encourage workers to remember their training.

“Scenario-based methods are very engaging,” according to one simulation training researcher quoted in the new research, OHS magazine reported. “That is how adults like to learn. They like to apply information that they already know or new information to situations that they are likely to experience or that they have experienced in the past.”

Whichever method oil and gas companies choose to pursue, it’s important for them to focus on the basics of training to help comply with safety regulations.